Study Aids

 
 

Sample Brain Bee Questions:

 
  http://vermontbrainbee.com/prepare/sample-questions/
http://www.internationalbrainbee.com/sample_questions
http://personal.denison.edu/~matthewsn/brainbeehowtostudy.html


 
  Some mnemonics to help with the brain structures:  
  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6xnMLr-sF7o


 
  An actual picture of the midbrain (hard for me to visualize)  
  http://library.med.utah.edu/WebPath/HISTHTML/NEURANAT/CNS016A.html


 
  Sympathetic vs. Parasympathetic:  
  http://www.caledonianchiropractic.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/wyDiagramNervousSystem.jpg

-- "the sympathetic nervous system is a 'quick response mobilising system' and the parasympathetic is a 'more slowly activated dampening system"


 
  Neural migration  
  http://www.nature.com/neuro/journal/v4/n2/extref/nn0201-143-S1.mpg


 
  Neural tube formation:  
  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M5NzACjICpE


 
  An audio version of the older Brain Facts edition:  
  https://itunes.apple.com/us/itunes-u/brain-facts-2008-edition-brain/id418622834


 
  The basal ganglia and ventricles can be visualized a lot better with the g2conline.org application- especially with understanding structures that get confused (fornix and basal ganglia).  
   


  A fun and informative way to learn. Watch some of the lectures from Robert Sapolsky's human behavior course, like this one on Schizophrenia: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nEnklxGAmak (the schizophrenia part starts at 23:45). There's s a lot of information, even in the relevant lectures, that is not necessary for the Brain Bee, but it's possible other students might find his lectures interesting.  
   
  The final tip I have for the Brain Bee students is to read and study the glossary -- there's a lot of stuff there that's not mentioned anywhere else in the Brain Facts book. Also, it's a great review.